Health & Beauty

Raynaud's Association Recognizes October as Raynaud's Awareness Month

Raynaud's Association reported that October is Raynaud's Awareness Month, a time to shed light on a medical disorder that afflicts 5-10 percent of the American population.

Four out of five of them are women.

According to a media release, Raynaud's Disease (also known as Raynaud's Phenomenon or Syndrome) is an exaggerated sensitivity to cold temperatures that causes numbness or pain as the tiny arteries that supply blood to the extremities narrow (vasospasms). Stress can also cause the reaction.

Fall and winter pose many hazards for sufferers. Scraping icy windshields, shoveling walkways, waiting for the bus, watching your kids' outdoor sports, etc. can cause painful spasms that last for hours. "Bundling yourself up with heavy clothes is great, but try using a cellphone or opening a door with a key when you have heavy gloves on," says Lynn Wunderman, founder and chair of the Raynaud's Association. "You have to take them off," she says. "It's no wonder why so many Frosties are feeling blue from the cold."

Often fingertips turn blue or white, then red (upon recovery), but it varies by individual. "We don't know the cause, and there's no cure yet for Raynaud's," says Wunderman.

According to the Raynaud's Association, 90 percent of Raynaud's sufferers do not seek treatment for the disorder. "They often brush it off by saying they have poor circulation," says Wunderman. "Well, that's true, but Raynaud's could be an indication of a serious and disabling underlying disease such as scleroderma or lupus."

A blood test known as the ANA (antinuclear antibody test) can determine whether the Raynaud's is primary or secondary to another inflammatory disease. "It may take years for the other disease signs to show up, so follow-up with your doctor is important," Wunderman says.

The Association noted that drugs such as calcium channel blockers may help take the "edge off" the spasms that result during an attack, or may help to reduce the formation of digital ulcers that occur in more serious cases. Drugs that increase blood flood such as those used for erectile dysfunction (ED) can also provide relief for many sufferers but are not covered by most insurers.

Biofeedback, tai chi, yoga and some other non-medicinal practices that aim to increase blood flow have helped to diminish the severity of attacks for some, but studies have been inconclusive. "At this point, much of the treatment for Raynaud's is geared toward avoiding cold or stress," Wunderman says. "Obviously, that's not always practical."

The Raynaud's Association is a 501(c)(3) charity whose primary mission is to raise awareness of the disorder so that sufferers will seek treatment.

More information:

www.raynauds.org

((Comments on this story may be sent to newsdesk@closeupmedia.com))

THE DAILY VIEW

  • Alexandra Scarborough
    Tea Forté Introduces ‘Matcha’ Collection

    Convenience meets tradition in Tea Forté’s new Ceremonial Matcha Bowl Set and the Matcha Single Steeps.

    The company said its spring harvested, shade grown, stone ground, organic matcha tea is best served in a centuries-old Japanese tea ceremony called chanoyu: a preparation technique known for its centering meditative qualities.

    "The launch of Tea Forté's Matcha collection represents our continued commitment to wellness and cultivating all the potential mental and physical health benefits of tea," says Tea Forté CEO Michael Gebrael. "In addition to our high quality Pure Matcha, we've also blended four distinct flavored Matcha varieties. Prepackaged in pouches measured out for a single serving, our Single Steeps Matcha is ideal for the office, travel, or to keep with you for a boost anytime."

    Tea Forté noted its handcrafted ceremonial tea bowl, handmade bamboo whisk and measuring ladle “encourages serene enjoyment of our premium Kosher, gluten-free and vegan matcha blends.” These include: Pure Matcha, Chocolate Matcha, Coconut Matcha, Ginger Matcha, and Chai Matcha.

    According to a release, in addition to its distinctive taste, matcha is prized for its health benefits. Steeped green tea contains only the antioxidants that can be extracted in water, while with matcha, the whole leaf is consumed.

    Available now in select stores and online at teaforte.com.

 

 

QUICK 5


Expedia.com has released a year-end look at U.S. traveler behavior and trends for 2017, analyzing data to identify the most in-demand destinations, hotels, activities and more.

Among other insights, the roundup revealed:

  1. Labor Day was the busiest weekend for car rental
  2. Disney Theme Parks topped the list of things to do
  3. The average hotel stay was two nights
  4. Top destinations based on 2017 air travel included major global cities like New York, London and Bangkok
  5. Popular tourist destinations included Orlando, Cancun and Las Vegas